Internet of Things Archive

What makes IoT ransomware a different and more dangerous threat?

Ransomware has already managed to carve itself a niche as one of the main cybersecurity threats of 2016. As individuals, organizations and government agencies, we’re taking precautionary steps to protect ourselves against malware that can encrypt files beyond our reach. What we’re ignoring though, is the next wave of ransomware attacks, which will not target our files, but rather our IoT devices, which can be more …

Apple is screwing up HomeKit; here’s how they can fix it

The real magic of the Internet of Things happens when devices work together. It will be magic when Siri, on your iPhone, can adjust your thermostat or confirm that you locked the back door; when your door lock can tell your sound system you’re home and you don’t even have to push a button to start the music. That’s not the reality we live in …

How IoT adopters can make efficient use of their data

The adoption of IoT technology can provide companies with unprecedented opportunities to reduce operating costs, increase productivity and tap into new markets previously inaccessible. But that won’t happen when IoT data gathers dust in the cloud. According to research by McKinsey Global Institute, of the IoT industry’s forecasted yearly value of $11.1 trillion by 2025, 60 percent is predicated on the ability to correctly integrate …

How smart materials will literally reshape the world around us

Over the past few years, the Internet of Things (IoT) has been the white-hot center of a flurry of activity. Startups that create embedded sensors for physical things have been snapped up by larger companies at a rapid pace, with deals for IoT startups totaling more than $30 billion in the past four years. The IoT may well be The Next Big Thing, but maybe …

Design fiction, the Internet of Women's things, and futurism

Jasmina Tesanovic (previously) and Bruce Sterling did a residency at The Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination at UCSD, working with the students on design fiction and futurism. The residency culminated in a joint lecture (Sterling is always best when tempered by Tesanovic, who rules him with a no-nonsense, Balkan fist!), about their “Internet of Women’s Things”-based house of the future, Casa …

"Smart" sex toy company sued for tracking users’ habits

“Smart” sex toy company sued for tracking users’ habits / Boing Boing A woman has filed a lawsuit against the manufacturer of a sex toy that sends data back to the company. From Vocativ: In the suit, N.P. says she bought a We-Vibe in May and used it “several times” until she realized that it was sending data about her usage practices back …

How connected cars are turning into revenue-generating machines

History repeats herself, but she mumbles. Some have expressed that she enjoys rhymes or puns. One must lean in close and listen carefully to understand exactly what she’s getting at. Most of the time we can only in retrospect discern what she was trying to say. Sometimes, though, history’s intent is clear. Evidence suggests a chain of events that will yield to an educated guess …

The IoT threat to privacy

As the Internet of Things becomes more widespread, consumers must demand better security and privacy protections that don’t leave them vulnerable to corporate surveillance and data breaches. But before consumers can demand change, they must be informed — which requires companies to be more transparent. The most dangerous part of IoT is that consumers are surrendering their privacy, bit by bit, without realizing it, because …

The Onion Omega2 lets you add Linux to your hardware projects

Need a tiny, $5 computer to build a robot that will bring you your slippers, initiate a massage chair session, and pour out your daily dose of bourbon?The Onion Omega2 can do all that and more. This tiny board is Arduino-compatible but also runs Linux natively. This means you can plug it in and get a command line or access the system via a desktop-like …

‘Smart’ locks yield to simple hacker tricks

It’s an open secret that the Internet of Things (if we must call it so) is pretty terrible, whether in standards, interoperability or security. You don’t really expect good security in a smart light bulb or coffee maker, though. A smart front door lock, however, really shouldn’t be quite this easy to hack. Two different presentations at DEF CON this year made it clear that …