Condé Nast Archive

Power Moves | Acqua di Parma Names CEO, Garage Appoints Editor-in-Chief

LONDON, United Kingdom — BoF compiles the most important professional moves of the week. Acqua di Parma Names CEOLaura Burdese has been appointed as chief executive officer of Acqua di Parma, effective immediately. She takes over from Gabriella Scarpa, who will continue in her role as chairman of LVMH Italy. Before joining Acqua di Parma, Burdese was country manager and managing director of Swatch Group Italy, …

Creative and Management Shake-up at Condé Nast Gathers Pace

NEW YORK, United States — And so it begins. Today, Condé Nast chief executive Bob Sauerberg sent a memo to employees vaguely outlining the next steps in what may be the greatest restructuring ever to take place at the company, set to fundamentally shift how the storied publishing house runs its business. Moving forward, Condé Nast will be restructured around five groups — roughly categorised as business, …

Power Moves | Peter Dundas Exits Cavalli, Executive Shake-up at Condé Nast

LONDON, United Kingdom — BoF compiles the most important professional moves of the week. Peter Dundas Exits Roberto CavalliAfter 19 months as creative director of Roberto Cavalli, Peter Dundas is leaving his role in the midst of a radical and comprehensive reorganisation of the house. Cavalli has not yet named a successor to Dundas, who joined the label in March 2015. Before that, the Norwegian worked as …

Condé Nast Executive Shuffle Suggests Further Shake-up to Come

NEW YORK, United States — A shakeup in the executive ranks at Condé Nast suggests the coming months won’t be quiet as it attempts to transform itself from a print-led publisher into a major digital player. On Monday, the New York-based owner of titles like Vogue, Vanity Fair and The New Yorker announced the appointment of Jim Norton to the newly created role of chief business officer …

Can Cost-Cutting Save Fashion Magazines?

NEW YORK, United States — It’s undeniable that print, as a medium, is in decline. The majority of editorial content is now being consumed digitally and most publishers have acknowledged that the future of the content industry lies online. Indeed, Hearst, Condé Nast and Time Inc. have each announced plans to significantly boost their digital offerings. In many cases, that means trimming the budgets of …